11 May, 2007

Some Selbu mittens for your pleasure

From left:
1. Korntrø-rosa, named for Korntrø Farm,
2. Hjart-rosa (Heart rose),
3. Skaltroll-rosa, also named Pine Cone Pattern (I believe)


4. Værhorns-rosa (Rams Horn rose),
5. Endløs-rosa (Endless rose), also called Grankvist (spruce branch),
6. Kinn'tyrill-rosa (though I have also seen this named Rams Horn rose)


Wouldn't they all make beautiful sweaters? Any of these patterns could be either done as bands or all-over. They would fit my criteria perfectly. I am considering designing my own.




In my quest for black and white patterns, I looked through some of my Norwegian text books. I found the above graphic in this book, The Mitten in Norwegian Tradition, which is written by Ingebjørg Gravjord and was published in 1986. Unfortunately I don't believe it is available in English, but I just read that it is being republished, so there is a chance that could spur a translation as well. I hope so.

It is a very comprehensive academic book, written by an expert in cultural history. She is a historian, as well as instructor in textiles at the Academy of Applied Art and Design(?) (Statens håndverks- og kunstindustri skole). It covers mittens in all forms, whether woven, nålbinding, twined knitting, or ordinary knitting, and the regional traditions and history associated with them.

Click on the picture to get a close up of the the gorgeous embroidered mitten from Telemark on the cover, with the year 1730 stitched on it. This mitten was done in nålbinding.
There are no patterns in this book, though it does contain some instructions on unusual techniques. This book, along with another by the same author called Knitting in Norway, are my main sources of historical knitting information. This is how I find out all about the olden days!

I also have a blog to share with you. Kathy has started a new inspiring blog where she is compiling all kinds of resources on Fair Isle and Norwegian knitting in one place, such as links to lots of tutorials and other informative sites. Check it out, she's an excellent writer, and it's a great resource!

20 comments:

  1. Wow, Hege, so beautiful, I've never seen anything like it, ever! I am just trying to imagine what the proud wearer of them looked like when these were worn in 1730. Its a miracle they survived all these years. Just spectacular! Thanks so much for posting the wonderful photos and sending me the link! Have an awesome week-end! I am thinking I should try to knit the cute hat you posted below, so adorable!

    Kathy

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  2. Thanks for the book review and blog link. I'll pick the book up if I ever run across it in the used bookstore! The embroidery on the cover is beautiful.

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  3. Hi Charm, unfortunately I don't think it's translated into English :( Sorry. I went ahead and updated that information above.

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  4. They're beautiful. Thanks, Hege. Definitely, I think you should design something for yourself!

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  5. Designing your own, but of course, go for it! I have the utmost faith in your capabilities.
    Thank you for the patterns AND the link...

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  6. I have been toying with the same idea, to use the selbu rose for an allover sweater pattern. There's one in the Ellinor Flor book you mentioned the other day, I think. Re. mittens - I assume you are familiar with the fabulous book about bunad håndplagg, mittens and wristwarmers from times that are long gone.

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  7. I never thought about it until now, but I see a heart motif repeated in some of these patterns, really like #1 and #6, gorgeous! I'll check out that blog, too, thanks! : )

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  8. are you finding many old patterns being reprinted with the rise of knitting a la norge in other countries?

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  9. I love your process. I can't wait to see where you go with this.

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  10. I love these charts. I'm into black and white too. There are a couple of sweaters I've saved for knitting in black and white one of these days. As for mittens, I'm somehow stuck in thinking that I must absolutely have a pair in red and white :)

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  11. My gosh, this is so beautiful! Thanks also for sharing the book review and the blog link, will have to go there right now to check it out!

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  12. Takk for hilsen i bloggen min!
    Den votteboka har gått meg hus forbi. Skal passe på å se etter den om den kommer i nytt opplag.
    Jeg felte av et sjal på lørdag, og har liksom pinnene litt fri akkraut nå. Får jo helt hetta, så jeg fant fram "Rosa heimifrå" i går. Tror jeg skal holde meg til enklere ting på strikkefronten akkurat nå, men det er jo lov å drømme. Blir spennende å se hva du kommer frem til som vintergenser-prosjekt!

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  13. Thank you so much for the link to Kathleens blog, it will be so helpful with my fair isle.

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  14. Yes - design something for yourself - you can do it, and you'll love it!

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  15. So beautiful Hege , thank-you. I used to dress Holly in very Karl Larsson inspired outfits .I'd knit a lot of Scandinavian knits when she was small.

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  16. Beautiful. Thanks a lot for sharing the charts, and for making me aware of the reprint of the mitten book! I took the liberty of linking to you in the discussion at the Selbuvotter pool on Flickr.

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  17. Thank you for osting the charts, and especially for posting the names.

    I saw that book once in a museum library and it is absolutely wonderful. Alas I can't read Norwegian, but the illustrations alone were awe inspiring.

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  18. Thanks for this pattern

    Elisabeth

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  19. Bonjour !
    Vos moufles sont magnifiques mais, personnellement, c'est un gilet, un véritable gilet norvégien bien épais, que je voudrais réaliser et je me demande où trouver les crochets pour le fermer. Auriez-vous une adresse où les commander par internet ?
    Je suis isadenimes@hotmail.com
    merci !

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  20. Hege! I just found this post via pinterest - what a small world! You *should* design your own sweaters, I would totally knit one.

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